Mayor Murray Statement on Court Hearing Regarding City’s Progress in Fulfilling Federal Consent Decree

Mayor Ed Murray released the following statement about today’s Federal Court hearing regarding the Consent Decree:

“Today Judge Robart affirmed that the Seattle Police Department, under the leadership of Chief O’Toole, is making significant progress on police reform, rebuilding community trust and becoming a national model for urban policing.

“The direction today from Judge Robart was clear: any reforms must align with the consent decree and be approved by the Court. As planned, I will be working with the Department of Justice, Federal Monitor, CPC, labor unions and City Attorney to achieve meaningful reforms to our civilian oversight system and improve accountability.”

 

 

Cooling shelter locations announced ahead of heat wave

The National Weather Service has issued an Excessive Heat Watch for Seattle and surrounding areas from Friday afternoon through late Saturday night. The City of Seattle is providing information and public spaces that may be used by residents to stay cool in the high temperatures.

Stay hydrated

  • Drink plenty of water. Have a beverage with you at all times, and sip or drink frequently. Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink.
  • Avoid drinks with caffeine, alcohol and large amounts of sugar because they can actually de-hydrate your body.

Protect your pets

Pets are especially vulnerable in high heat and the Seattle Animal Shelter recommends the following:

  • Never leave your animal chained or penned up directly in sunlight. Provide a shady area for retreat, such as a dog house, porch or shady tree, and always provide cool water.
  • If you leave animals indoors, open screened windows, keep a fan running, provide plenty of water, and if possible, leave them in a cool location.
  • Never leave dogs or cats unattended in a closed, locked car. Animals do not perspire like humans; they cool themselves by panting and seats in vehicles get hot under animals’ feet and prevent them from perspiring through their paws.
  • If you must travel with your pet, carry water. If a trip requires you leave your pet in the car at any point, think about saving that for another day. It’s not worth the risk.
  • Avoid overexerting your animal in hot weather. Exercise is fine when taken in moderation, but obesity, old age, underlying disease and previous bouts of heat stroke can predispose an animal to the condition.
  • For birds, take caution and place the bird’s cage away from direct sunlight during the intense heat of the afternoon. Provide water and fruits and vegetables with high moisture content.

Libraries

The following Seattle Public Library locations are equipped with air conditioning, and serve as cooling centers when the area experiences extreme heat. Please call the individual location before you go for open hours and to verify that the air conditioning is working.

  • Central Library (1000 4th Ave) – 206-386-4636
  • Ballard (5614 22nd Ave NW) – 206-684-4089
  • Beacon Hill (2821 Beacon Ave S) – 206-684-4711
  • Broadview (12755 Greenwood Ave N) – 206-684-7519
  • Capitol Hill (425 Harvard Ave E) – 206-684-4715
  • Delridge (5423 Delridge Way SW) – 206-733-9125
  • Douglass-Truth (2300 E Yesler Way) – 206-684-4704
  • Greenwood (8016 Greenwood Ave N) – 206-684-4086
  • High Point (3411 SW Raymond St) – 206-684-7454
  • International District / Chinatown (713 8th Ave S) – 206-386-1300
  • Lake City (12501 28th Ave NE) – 206-684-7518
  • Madrona-Sally Goldmark (1134 33rd Ave) – 206-684-4705
  • Magnolia (2801 34th Ave W) – 206-386-4225
  • NewHolly (7058 32nd Ave S) – 206-386-1905
  • Northgate (10548 5th Ave NE) – 206-386-1980
  • Rainier Beach (9125 Rainier Ave S) – 206-386-1906
  • South Park (8604 8th Ave S) – 206-615-1688
  • Wallingford (1501 N 45th St) – 206-684-4088

Seattle Center (View the campus map PDF at http://www.seattlecenter.com/downloads/sc_map_color_gates.pdf) – 206-684-7200

  • Seattle Center Armory (Open from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m.)
  • International Fountain
  • Fountain of Creation (Dupen Fountain)

Senior Centers
The following senior centers have air conditioning or are relatively cool and are open to the public. Please call the individual location before you go for open hours and to verify that the facility is cool.

  • Asian Counseling and Referral Service Senior Center (3639 Martin Luther King Way S.) – 206-695-7600
  • Ballard NW Senior Center (5429 32nd Ave NW) – 206-297-0403
  • Central Area Senior Center (500 30th Ave S) – 206-726-4926
  • Greenwood Senior Center (525 N. 85th Street) – 206-297-0875
  • International Drop-In Center (7301 Beacon Ave S.) – 206-587-3735
  • Pike Market Senior Center and Food Bank (85 Pike St, #200) – 206-728-2773
  • The Senior Center of West Seattle (4217 SW Oregon St) – 206-932-4044
  • Southeast Seattle Senior Center (4655 South Holly St) – 206-722-0317
  • Sunshine Garden Chinese Senior Community Center (611 S. Lane St.) housed in the Chinese Information and Service Center – 206-624-5633
  • Wallingford Community Senior Center (4649 Sunnyside Ave N, Suite 140) – 206-461-7825

Pools and Water Areas

Four-day-a-week Wading Pools (both are open noon to 6:45 p.m.):

  • Hiawatha Community Center, 2700 California Ave. SW, Wed/Thurs/Fri/Sat
  • Delridge Community Center, 4501 Delridge Way SW, Mon/Tues/Sat/Sun

Three-day-a-week Wading Pools (all are open from noon to 7 p.m. unless otherwise noted):

  • Bitter Lake, 13035 Linden Ave. N, Wed/Thu/Fri
  • Cal Anderson Park, 1635 11th Ave., noon to 6:45 p.m., Fri/Sat/Sun
  • Dahl Playfield, 7700 25th Ave. NE, Tues/Wed/Thurs
  • East Queen Anne, 160 Howe St., Sun/Mon/Tue
  • E.C. Hughes, 2805 SW Holden St., Wed/Thu/Fri
  • Soundview, 1590 NW 90th St., Sat/Sun/Mon
  • South Park, 8319 8th Ave. S, Mon/Tue/Wed
  • Wallingford, 4219Wallingford Ave. N, Wed/Thu/Fri

Daily Wading Pools (all are open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. unless otherwise noted):

  • Green Lake, N 73rd and E Green Lake Dr. N
  • Lincoln Park, 8600 Fauntleroy Ave. SW
  • Magnuson, eastern end of NE 65th St., noon to 6:30 p.m.
  • Van Asselt, 2820 S Myrtle St.
  • Volunteer Park, 1400 E Galer St.

Daily Water Spray Parks (all are open from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. unless otherwise noted):

  • Ballard Commons, 5701 22nd Ave. NW
  • Beacon Mountain at Jefferson Park, 3901 Beacon Ave. S
  • John C. Little, 6961 37th Ave. S
  • Lower Judkins, 2150 S Norman St.
  • Georgetown Playfield, 750 S Homer St.
  • Highland Park, 1100 SW Cloverdale
  • Lake Union Park, 860 Terry Ave. N
  • Miller Community Center, 330 19th Ave. E
  • Northacres Park, 12800 1st Ave. NE
  • Pratt Park, 1800 S Main St.

Lifeguarded Beaches  (noon to 7 p.m. weekdays and 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays)

  • Matthews, 9300 51st Ave. NE
  • Madison, 1900 43rd Ave. E
  • Baker, 2301 Lake Washington Blvd. S
  • Seward, 5902 Lake Washington Blvd. S
  • West Green Lake, 7312 W Green Lake Dr.
  • East Green Lake, 7201 E Green Lake Dr. N
  • Magnuson, park entrance at NE 65th and Sand Point Way NE
  • Madrona, 853 Lake Washington Blvd.
  • Pritchard Beach, 8400 55th S

Outdoor Pools

  • “Pop” Mounger Pool, 2535 32nd W, daily, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., call 206-684-4708 for public swim times
  • Colman Pool, 8603 Fauntleroy Way SW, daily, noon to 7 p.m., call 206-684-7494 for public swim times

Additional resources

Mayor introduces new legislation requiring places of public accommodation to designate all-gender restrooms

Today Mayor Ed Murray introduced legislation that would require all City-controlled and privately operated places of public accommodation to designate existing or future single-occupant restrooms as all-gender facilities. All existing City-controlled single-occupant restrooms (across all City departments, from City Hall to Parks) will be re-signed to conform to this new standard. The proposal was one that was introduced to the City by the Seattle LGBT Commission as part of its ongoing work, and is one of the early recommendations from the Mayor’s LGBT Task Force.

“The transgender community deserves the dignity and respect that most people take for granted,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “That’s why Seattle is building upon our history of being one of the most welcoming cities in the world by ensuring restrooms are available and safe for all.”

This legislation is a powerful and appropriate step in serving the needs of our time and place,” said Marsha Botzer, founding member and secretary of Equal Rights Washington, former chair of the National LGBTQ Task Force, and Founder of Seattle’s Ingersoll Gender Center. “With gender identity now part of a larger Community understanding of what it means to be human, Seattle provides real leadership in responding to and respecting the safety needs of all people who live here.  For decades Ingersoll Gender Center has served transgender and gender nonconforming people, and I know personally that this legislation will help individuals.”

This legislation honors that history and reaffirms the City’s commitment to gender equity by implementing measures to provide for all-gender restroom facilities and amending the Seattle Municipal Code to eliminate single-occupant restroom restrictions to a specific sex or gender identity. Single-occupant restrooms in City facilities and all public accommodations (including restaurants, coffee shops, stores, etc.) will be signed for all genders, rather than “men” or “women.”

Despite existing laws protecting a person’s right to use a restroom consistent with their gender identity, transgender and gender nonconforming people are frequently excluded from using facilities consistent with their gender identity, and use of gender-segregated restrooms can create unnecessary risk for transgender and gender nonconforming people.

If passed, the Seattle Office of Civil Rights (SOCR) will be responsible for enforcing these changes.

Mayor Murray and Chief O’Toole announce Safe Place program

SPD_SAFE_PLACEMayor Murray and Chief of Police Kathleen O’Toole announced SPD Safe Place, a public education and visibility campaign aimed at preventing and responding to anti-LGBT bias crimes.

“Seattle welcomes all people,” said Mayor Ed Murray. “There is no place for bigotry or harassment in our city. We developed Safe Place so that businesses and community organizations can visibly stand up against intolerance and provide shelter to victims.”

SPD Safe Place is a voluntary program that provides businesses and organizations with decals and information on how to report malicious harassment, more commonly known as hate crimes. Training for these organizations includes when and how to call 911, sheltering victims of crime until police arrive and proactive outreach about working with the SPD’s LGBT liaison officer.

“Seattle Police officers work every day with the diverse communities of Seattle to ensure safety. SPD Safe Place is another way of connecting and educating those who live, work and visit Seattle about how the SPD can assist in times of crisis,” said Chief Kathleen O’Toole.

Businesses, organizations and educational institutions can request SPD Safe Place placards or posters and learn about how to work with police to prevent and address anti-LGBT crime concerns at www.seattle.gov/spd-safe-place.

Mayor Murray announces expanded shelter beds for Seattle’s homeless youth

Today, Mayor Murray announced the increase and year round expansion of shelter beds available exclusively for homeless youth. This expansion is made available by an additional $130,000 investment with Peace for the Street by Kids from the Streets (PSKS) to extend its temporary cold weather shelter to a year round, five day a week operation. In addition, the bed capacity in this shelter will increase from 15 to 20 total by June 2015.

“In a region like ours where there is such tremendous wealth, it’s heartbreaking that any of our youth experience homelessness,” Mayor Ed Murray said. “That’s why it is vital that we provide a warm bed, a pillow, and some relief from the dangers of the street. While permanent, safe housing is the ultimate goal, securing these additional resources will mean a few more young people every night won’t have to sleep on the streets.”

“We are thrilled by the news that the City of Seattle will extend funding for PSKS and Mt. Zion Baptist Church to continue our collaboration to shelter homeless youth and young adults beyond the winter months,” said Susan Fox, Executive Director, PSKS. “This shelter is often the last resort for many of the youth we serve as many have pet companions, identify as LGBTQ, and are dealing with difficult life circumstances. I commend the mayor for recognizing this critical need and addressing this service gap.”

The added shelter beds announced today are consistent with the Mayor’s Emergency Task Force on Unsheltered Homelessness recommendation to add new shelter beds to meet the needs of unsheltered homeless young people living in Seattle.

“I am pleased by Peace for the Street by Kids from the Streets and Mt. Zion Baptist Church for their commitment to providing safe and decent shelter for Seattle’s homeless youth,” said Catherine Lester, Director, Seattle Human Services Department. “Any viable solution to youth homelessness will require partnership and collaboration with services providers, community groups and the faith community as demonstrated in this important project.”

PSKS has been operating a 15 bed youth shelter, five nights per week at Mt. Zion Baptist Church in Seattle’s Central District. This shelter was originally funded by the Mayor for the first quarter of 2015 as a temporary cold weather shelter and as overflow for other youth serving shelters in the city.

Mayor, Council call for review of Shell’s Arctic drilling fleet permits at Port of Seattle’s Terminal 5

Mayor Ed Murray and the Seattle City Council announced today that Seattle’s Department of Planning and Development (DPD) will review, investigate and determine whether the plans at Port of Seattle’s Terminal 5 to host Shell Oil’s Arctic drilling fleet are allowed under the current Shoreline Substantial Development Permit granted to Terminal 5.

Reports indicate that Shell Oil would moor vessels that are returning from drilling in the Artic. In the past, Shell’s drilling fleet has needed extensive repairs, maintenance and conversions after returning from a season of drilling. These activities may substantially change Terminal 5’s use and require new, different permits than the one currently granted by DPD which could require additional environmental review if the Port wishes to move forward with the lease.

“Any project of this apparent significance to our industrial lands must go through the appropriate review. It’s important that the public and surrounding businesses are informed of all the possible impacts of this lease – both economic and environmental – and that these impacts are sufficiently disclosed and evaluated,” Murray said. “This is why I’m directing DPD to conduct a thorough review of the Terminal 5 proposal and determine if the anticipated activities at the terminal involving the Shell drilling fleet require new permits before it can proceed.”

“I have grave concerns about Shell Oil’s Arctic drilling fleet coming to Puget Sound in a damaged state, discharging oil and other toxic pollutants along our shorelines during transport and repair, jeopardizing the local ecosystem and undoing decades of work to clean up the Sound,” said Councilmember Mike O’Brien. “Shell’s track record with the Noble Discoverer in the Arctic includes eight felony offenses relating to environmental and maritime crimes, such as discharging oil-contaminated water directly overboard, which is simply unacceptable.”

“For years the Port and the City have worked together to develop rational solutions and develop alternative treatment technologies to reduce pollution in the Duwamish and Elliott Bay,” said Councilmember Sally Bagshaw. “While the immediate value of a lease to repair Arctic drilling equipment may appear to be high, we believe this agreement is shortsighted and ignores the long-term costs to our economy and environment.”

The current permit, called a Shoreline Substantial Development Permit, designated Terminal 5 as a “cargo terminal” – usually meaning goods are stored and ultimately transferred from this terminal to other carriers or locations. But if the Artic drilling fleet is actually being moored and repaired at Terminal 5, there could be significant and adverse impacts on the surrounding environment. As part of DPD’s investigation and fact-finding, the Department will begin working with the Port of Seattle to clarify all of the activities anticipated at Terminal 5, including, but not limited to, the types of vessels to be moored and the maintenance and repairs to be conducted.

City of Seattle Mayor’s office seeking AmeriCorps VISTA

vistaThe City of Seattle has received a City Hall AmeriCorps VISTA Program grant from Cities of Service, a national organization that provides technical assistance, programmatic support, planning resources and funding opportunities to coalition member cities.

Cities of Service is providing the City of Seattle with both financial and human capital support, including $30,000 and two AmeriCorps VISTA members. The AmeriCorps VISTA Members will support the Office of Mayor Ed Murray in planning and implementing a neighborhood revitalization initiative in low-income neighborhoods. This initiative – Find It, Fix It Community Walks – is a high-impact service strategy in which the Mayor’s Office engages community members in revitalizing their neighborhoods, one block at a time. To learn more about Find It, Fix It Community Walks, visit murray.seattle.gov/finditfixit.

The City Hall AmeriCorps VISTA Program will allow Seattle to enhance and strengthen Community Walks by better engaging community residents. VISTA members will focus on using Community Walk planning and outreach to increase participation in city-based volunteer programs. This work will include designing strategies to recruit volunteers for city revitalization programs, leading community outreach efforts in neighborhoods selected for Community Walks, promoting and publicizing Community Walks, and developing impact metrics and outcome measurements for Community Walks.

Member Duties:

  • Work with the Mayor’s Office to implement and enhance Mayor Murray’s Find It, Fix It Community Walk program.
  • Design Community Walk evaluation metrics and evaluate the program’s success.
  • Help “Love Your Block” mini-grant recipients implement their proposals.
  • Organize and lead Neighborhood Action Teams (NATs) at each Community Walk site. NATs will bring together department representatives, local businesses, and neighborhood leaders to develop strategies to promote Community Walks and think up solutions to infrastructure problems.
  • Work with NATs and city departments to conduct neighborhood outreach and encourage residents to participate in Walk-related clean-up projects. Outreach strategies include attending community events and meetings.
  • Work with the Mayor’s communications team to publicize Community Walks

Desired Qualifications:

  • Sense of humor.
  • Outgoing and comfortable with public speaking.
  • Experience in municipal government a plus.
  • Experience working in diverse communities a plus.
  • Experience volunteering and/or working with volunteers (or teaching/group facilitation).
  • Strong oral and written communication skills.
  • Strong computer skills.
  • Strong leadership skills, ability to lead a team.
  • Experience planning and executing events and activities a plus.
  • Able to manage and work with volunteers of varying skill levels and ages.
  • Detail-oriented and highly organized.
  • Able to learn new skills and take direction.
  • Experience working in environments with strong social justice values a plus

Program Benefits: Childcare assistance if eligible, Training, Relocation Allowance, Choice of Education Award or End of Service Stipend, Living Allowance, Health Coverage, Stipend, Education award upon successful completion of service.

Program Type: AmeriCorps VISTA
Program Start/End Date: 06/20/2015  –  06/18/2016
Work Schedule: Full Time
Education level: College graduate
Age Requirement: 18+Program location: Seattle, WA. VISTA members will have desks in the Mayor’s Office.
Accepting Applications: Until 3/16/15
Please email applications to: carlo.caldirola-davis@seattle.govApplications should include:

1.       Resume

2.       Cover letter (explain your interest in service and, in particular, Mayor Murray’s Find It, Fix It Community Walk program).

3.       References (at least two)

 

Harold Scoggins nominated as Seattle Fire Chief

Scoggins

Today, Mayor Murray nominated Harold Scoggins as the next Chief of the Seattle Fire Department.

“As Seattle grows rapidly over the next 20 years, our fire service must continue to evolve to serve the city’s public safety needs,” said Murray. “Our department saves lives every day and our Medic One program remains a national leader in paramedic training for our fire fighters. Chief Scoggins has an outstanding track record and brings the right kind of experience to Seattle.”

Scoggins comes to the Seattle Fire Department from Glendale, CA. He joined the Glendale Fire Department 25 years ago as a fire fighter and rose through the ranks, serving at every level of the department. He was named chief in Glendale in 2008.

“I am honored to serve as the Fire Chief for the City of Seattle,” said Scoggins. “I look forward to working with the men and women of Seattle Fire Department to set its course for the future. My family and I are also very excited about the community and all it has to offer.”

The department currently has 80 vacancies. The mayor is directing Chief Scoggins to intensify recruitment of a diverse workforce of fire fighters, as well as ensure proper succession planning at lieutenant, captain and senior leadership positions in the department.

The Seattle Fire Department’s percentage of women fire fighters is 8.4 percent, which exceeds the national average of 3.4 percent, and the mayor is urging continued focus on the recruitment of qualified women.

“I look forward to working with Chief Scoggins, who will lead the best group of firefighters in the country – protecting us daily and providing emergency care that keeps us all safe,” said Councilmember Bruce Harrell, chair of the Council’s Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology Committee. “One critical aspect for the new Chief will be to complete implementation of the five-year strategic plan completed in 2012, setting goals for developing leadership abilities of Fire Department employees at all levels, helping employees develop and improve, health and safety, ensuring a diverse and inclusive workforce, fostering community outreach and partnerships, and maintaining equipment and technology critical to the department.”

The Seattle Fire Department has more than 1,100 employees and an annual budget of $178 million. Fire fighters at 33 stations serve 640,000 residents and respond to more than 88,000 alarms each year.

Today, more than 80 percent of fire emergency responses are medical in nature, a trend that is expected to grow. In January, the department added a new aid unit downtown with 10 additional firefighters. The mayor is expecting further recommendations regarding the department’s structure from the new chief.

Scoggins served for five years as a fire fighter in the U.S. Air Force before joining the Glendale Fire Department in 1989. He was promoted to Fire Engineer in 1996, Fire Captain in 1998 and Battalion Chief in 2003. In that position, he was responsible for recruitment, hiring and training of the department’s fire fighters. In 2007, he was appointed Deputy Fire Chief, before being named Chief of the Glendale Fire Department a year later.

Scoggins is a past-president of the Los Angeles Area Fire Chief’s Association. He taught Fire Science as an adjunct professor at Mt. San Antonio College and El Camino College. He has served on the boards of several non-profit organizations, and is an active community volunteer.

Scoggins earned his associate’s degree in Fire Technology from Glendale Community College in 1994, a B.S. in Fire Administration from California State University Los Angeles in 1996 and a Master of Public Administration from California State University Long Beach in 2007.

Scoggins replaces Seattle Fire Chief Gregory Dean, who retired at the end of 2014 after a decade at the helm. Interim Chief Michael Walsh, who first joined the department in 1971, stepped in to fill the role for the first part of 2015.

“I certainly welcome Chief Scoggins as the new chief of the Fire Department,” said Interim Fire Chief Michael Walsh. “We pledge our full support to ensure a smooth transition.”

“We are looking forward to working with our new fire chief,” said Kenny Stuart, President of Seattle Fire Fighters Union, Local 27. “Seattle fire fighters need strong, high-quality leadership to meet the increasing challenges in today’s modern fire service, including increased call volume, a growing city, significant training demands and the constant threat of cancer and heart attacks for fire fighters.”

Chief Scoggins’ first day at the department will be April 1. He will be paid an annual salary of $205,000.

Mayor Murray seeking board members for Seattle Fire Code Advisory Board

Mayor Murray is seeking board members for the Seattle Fire Code Advisory Board to represent major institutions (including hospitals and universities), or manufacturing/warehousing, or the services industry (including nightclubs, entertainment, and retail).  Board members are appointed by the Mayor and confirmed by City Council. They advise the City on updates and revisions to the fire code and have played a crucial role in ensuring it works for those who live, visit and conduct business in Seattle. This is a rewarding professional role and we look forward to hearing from you.

To apply, please send your resume and a cover letter indicating why you would like to join the Board by March 20, 2015, to Karen Grove in the Seattle Fire Marshal’s Office at karen.grove@seattle.gov or 206-386-1451, or visit the Fire Code Advisory Board website.

Neighbors invited to University District ‘Find It, Fix It’ Community Walk

FIFI-LOGOMayor Murray’s ‘Find It, Fix It’ Community Walks, focused on Seattle crime hotspots, are starting again in 2015. This first walk of the year will be held in Seattle’s University District on Saturday, Feb. 21 beginning at 11 a.m.

At the walk, community leaders and residents, police, and city officials will gather together to identify physical disorder and solve it. The City’s Find It, Fix It mobile app will feature a new “Community Walk” button to help report any street disorder observed the day of the walk in order to organize and expedite fixes in the neighborhood.

In 2014, walks in the Central District, Lake City, Rainier Beach and several other neighborhoods led to significant improvements made in those neighborhoods. You can watch videos, view photos and read actions taken as a result of these walks at: http://murray.seattle.gov/finditfixit

This year, the City will be able to leverage more resources for the community walks thanks to a $30,000 grant from the Cities of Service “City Hall AmeriCorps VISTA Love Your Block” program, which incentivizes local governments to engage communities in neighborhood revitalization efforts.

University District Find It, Fix It Community Walk:

  • Saturday, Feb. 21, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
  • Meet at intersection of 45th Ave and Brooklyn Ave.

Community walk led and emceed by Captain David Emerick, SPD

11:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m.

  • Welcome remarks from Mayor Ed Murray
  • Light Rail Station – SoundTransit Project Manager Kate Lichenstein
  • Find It, Fix It App tutorial – City of Seattle FAS

11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.

  • Walk commences through the neighborhood (map)

1:00 p.m.

  • Walk concludes at the UW Campus at the intersection of 42nd Ave and 15th Ave with closing remarks from University of Washington Interim President Ana Mari Cauce.
  • Department representatives and city staff will be available for follow-up questions.
  • Refreshments will be provided by UW and Starbucks.