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New community engagement plan will bring more diverse voices to City

This week Mayor Murray signed an executive order to bring greater equity to the City’s system for promoting public engagement among residents of Seattle’s neighborhoods.

Murray’s executive order directs City departments to begin developing robust community engagement plans, and takes steps toward dissolving the City’s formal and financial ties to each of the thirteen district councils, a system that has not changed since it was established in 1987. Resources that previously supported the district councils will be redirected to support all City departments in their outreach efforts.

In 2009, the City Auditor issued a report advocating for a reset of the District Council system, due in part to the low-level of diverse representation on the district councils. The new plan will seek to engage, among others, immigrants and refugees, low-income residents, communities of color, renters, single parents, youth, people experiencing homelessness, and LGBTQ individuals.

For immigrants and refugees, low-income residents, communities of color, renters, single parents, youth, people experiencing homelessness, LGBTQ, and mor - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.oVJrXe7w.dpuf
For immigrants and refugees, low-income residents, communities of color, renters, single parents, youth, people experiencing homelessness, LGBTQ, and mor - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.oVJrXe7w.dpuf
For immigrants and refugees, low-income residents, communities of color, renters, single parents, youth, people experiencing homelessness, LGBTQ, and mor - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.oVJrXe7w.dpuf
For immigrants and refugees, low-income residents, communities of color, renters, single parents, youth, people experiencing homelessness, LGBTQ, and mor - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.oVJrXe7w.dpuf
For immigrants and refugees, low-income residents, communities of color, renters, single parents, youth, people experiencing homelessness, LGBTQ, and mor - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.oVJrXe7w.dpuf
For immigrants and refugees, low-income residents, communities of color, renters, single parents, youth, people experiencing homelessness, LGBTQ, and mor - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.oVJrXe7w.dpuf
For immigrants and refugees, low-income residents, communities of color, renters, single parents, youth, people experiencing homelessness, LGBTQ, and mor - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.oVJrXe7w.dpuf
system, established in 1987, includes thirteen area-based councils whose membership includes local residents representing their neighborhood’s community council, business associations, and nonprofit organizations. In 2009, the City Auditor issued a strongly-worded report advocating for a reset of the District Council system, due in part to the low-level of diverse representation on the district councils. - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.Yp7Bgevu.dpuf sy
system, established in 1987, includes thirteen area-based councils whose membership includes local residents representing their neighborhood’s community council, business associations, and nonprofit organizations. In 2009, the City Auditor issued a strongly-worded report advocating for a reset of the District Council system, due in part to the low-level of diverse representation on the district councils. - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.Yp7Bgevu.dpuf
system, established in 1987, includes thirteen area-based councils whose membership includes local residents representing their neighborhood’s community council, business associations, and nonprofit organizations. In 2009, the City Auditor issued a strongly-worded report advocating for a reset of the District Council system, due in part to the low-level of diverse representation on the district councils. - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.Yp7Bgevu.dpuf
system, established in 1987, includes thirteen area-based councils whose membership includes local residents representing their neighborhood’s community council, business associations, and nonprofit organizations. In 2009, the City Auditor issued a strongly-worded report advocating for a reset of the District Council system, due in part to the low-level of diverse representation on the district councils. - See more at: http://murray.seattle.gov/#sthash.Yp7Bgevu.dpuf

Work is already underway to create a new citywide community engagement framework and strategic plan for in-person and digital engagement.

More information here. Watch the press conference:

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Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative partners recognized

This week Mayor Murray recognized top partners of the Mayor’s Youth Employment Initiative (MYEI), which connects Seattle youth ages 14-24 with paid internships and employment opportunities.

The mayor thanked the Port of Seattle, Alaska Airlines, Goodwill, Swedish Medical Center, JPMorgan Chase, AT&T and Starbucks for their support of the initiative, which ranges from hosting interns to donating funds to support wages for youth placed at other organizations.

Together with local employers, the City and has connected 2,000 youth with employment opportunities so far this year through MYEI. The program also helps employers by connecting them with the next generation of workers to fill the employee pipeline.

To learn more and register your organization to participate in the initiative, visit murray.seattle.gov/youthjobs.

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Myers Way property preserved as open space

Following months of community input, this week Mayor Murray announced the planned usage for the Myers Way property in Southwest Seattle.

“Thank you to those who shared their input on the future of the Myers Way property,” said Murray. “The City will retain the land, dedicating the four-acre northernmost portion for important fire training needs and expanding the Joint Training Facility. The remainder of the property will be retained and designated for open space and/or recreation purposes, consistent with the community response provided through our outreach. At a future date, Seattle Parks and Recreation will conduct further public outreach to determine how best to use the property.”

Seattle Parks and Recreation does not currently have resources needed to immediately repurpose the site, but the Department will retain the property as one of its “land banked” sites. Holding such properties ensures that valuable open space is not lost, even if resources for repurposing the property are not immediately available.

The Myers Way property is one of the largest pieces of undeveloped City-owned land and is adjacent to the Seattle-White Center border.

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Micro Community Policing Plan website launched

This week the Seattle Police Department launched its new Micro Community Policing Plans (MCPP) site. The updated site features crime data, interactive dashboards, and strategies deployed by SPD to address priorities identified by the City’s 57 MCPP neighborhoods.

MCPP are the result of grassroots efforts, with direct collaboration from residents, business leaders, stakeholders, and police officers on the beat. Under the MCPP, community residents work in partnership with their local precinct captain and Community Policing Team to identify problems, analyze existing quality of life and crime data, and design individualized plans to reduce and prevent crime.

For more information.

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Find It, Fix It Community Walks head to Roxhill and Westwood

Save the date and join us: The Roxhill and Westwood Find It, Fix It Community Walk will be held on Monday, July 25 from 6:30 – 8 p.m. and will follow a route determined by community members serving on its Community Walk Action Team.

Find It, Fix It walks bring together City officials, business owners, and community members to address neighborhood needs.

For more information.

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Traffic impacts this weekend

Keep up to date on traffic impacts at onthemove.seattle.gov or follow @seattledot on Twitter

Saturday, July 16:

Seattle to Portland Bicycle Classic: The ride starts at the University of Washington at 4:45 a.m. The last group leaves at 7:30 a.m. Most riders leave the city limits by 9 a.m.

Seafair Derby Day: The Seafair Milk Carton Derby at Green Lake goes from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Saturday and Sunday, July 16 and 17

Bite of Seattle: The food festival at Seattle Center runs Saturday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

Seattle Bon Odori Festival: The Japanese Buddhist Festival featuring music, dancing and food booths runs Saturday, 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. on S Main St between 14th and 16th Ave S. The street closes Friday at 5 p.m. and reopens Sunday at 11:30 p.m.

Dragon Fest: The weekend festival in the Chinatown-International District featuring Dragon and Lion dances, martial arts demonstrations and a food walk. Hours: Saturday, 12 p.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday, 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.

Boeing Centennial: The Boeing Company’s 100th year anniversary celebration is at The Museum of Flight.  E Marginal Way S will be closed south of the South Park Bridge.

Sunday, July 17:

Swedish SummeRun & Walk: A 5K run and walk for ovarian cancer research in the First Hill neighborhood. The race starts at 8:15 a.m. and ends at 12 p.m.

Go Klondike Legacy Day: A celebration of the day Seattle struck gold featuring 1890’s entertainment, a salmon BBQ, a living history show and kids activities. The festival is on 2nd Ave S between S Jackson and S Main streets from 12 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.

Georgetown Cycling Criterium: A bicycle race through Georgetown runs from 9:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.

MARINERS SCHEDULE AT SAFECO FIELD:

Saturday, July 16, Mariners vs. Houston, 1:10 p.m.

Sunday, July 17, Mariners vs. Houston, 1:10 p.m.

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